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. >> hank, you own bank stocks. are you not worried about this? >> no. in fact, in a rising rate environment, as long as rates don't spike up dramatically overnight, in a rising rate environment, banks are going to make more money. >> no, they're not. >> and become even stronger and healthier. and we own two of the highest quality banks in the world, jpmorgan and wells fargo. >> their customers can't -- the borrowers can't afford to pay the higher rates. what's going to happen to the value of the existing collateral when interest rates spike? eventually they're going to spike. the fed has waited far too long to raise them. when they rise they'll rise faster and higher than anyone believes. >> bob pisani, we're not really seeing the impact -- go ahead, jason. >> sure. injury. i'll add in here. i don't fully agree with what your guest is saying here as far as immediately rising rates and banks falling apart. having said that, i think the world has changed and we have to recognize the big picture here. number one, bank business models are not the same they used to be. they're not the great inve
. ♪ chevron has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> welcome back to "the kudlow report." i'm larry kudlow, in half hour, the situation in cyprus is on the edge of the abyss, if russia did not bail them out, their economy will implode and they will be forced out of the euro economy entirely. and senator kelly ayotte is looking to get a budget deal without more spending and taxes and i want to know if the so-called gop reforms are going to split the party in two or make it more inclusive. senators working against a needless missile to nowhere program that she will explain to us. ben bernanke is keeping his foot firmly on the qe gas pedal or did he? please take a listen. >> we are seeing improvement. i think one thing we would need is to make sure that it's not a temporary improvement. so, we have seen periods before where we had as many as 30
environment for the fed reserve to stay stock market friendly. that's exactly what happened today. ben bernanke allowed the averages to power higher. dow gained 56 points. the s&p rising today, nasdaq jumping .78%. it's not sleight of hand or alchemy at work here, despite what critics say when they constantly slam the fed. >> boo! >> bernanke is not playing a game of move the stock market higher by simply continuing to keep the competition from bonds incredibly weak. he's got a real good reason for doing what he's doing, which is staying the course, keeping rates low. that reason? 1937. see, ben bernanke is a rigorous guy. he's a professor and a genuine scholar of american financial history. it's what he does best. he knows that in 1937 after three years of 12% economic growth that took unemployment from 25% down to 14%, the fed, the president, congress, declared victory over the great depression. ♪ hallelujah >> washington raised income taxes on the wealthy. >> boo! >> took the top marginal rate to the astounding 75% and instituted a 2% payroll tax for social security. their goal? t
need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ [ticking] >> as of late 2012, the justice department had not prosecuted any countrywide financial executive, despite the allegations of widespread mortgage fraud inside the company. and, as steve kroft reported, in december 2011, even more puzzling, was the justice department's reluctance to employ one of its most powerful legal weapons against anyone in the company. it's called the sarbanes-oxley act of 2002. [applause] >> it was overwhelmingly passed by congress and signed by president bush following the last big round of corporate scandals involving enron, tyco, and worldcom. it was supposed to restore confidence in american corporations and financial markets. the sarbanes-oxley act imposed strict rules for corporate governance, requiring chief executive officers and chief financial officers to certify under oath that their financial stateme
-on/risk-off environment that we have to be cautious. yes, there's room to grows and investors have totally forgotten about europe since last summer. don't be surprised if it comes back later on this year. and quite heavily. >> how does it come back, though? is it the banking sector? specifically, let's talk about actual impacts to the u.s. market. >> well, the impact has a lot to do with the concern of where we're going, the kind of money we're spending and the kind of debt we have. you know, we're not too far behind europe. and obviously, we're a long way away from greece, but when you look at germany and france and some other companies, it's still a very dangerous environment. they still have a very low to negative growth rate. we're still looking at positive. you know, we had some good response from the housing market earlier today, but we still need to be very, very cautious. yes, there's room to grow. prices of stocks are not overvalued by no means. but we still need to be very cautious of where we're going in terms of debt and the economy. >> all right. so we're vulnerable in that regard. let's talk
, and we need to really realize that we are still in a very slow growth environment. >> well, robert, let me ask you about earnings and whether or not we are going to see an upset once we start getting the numbers for the first quarter. the s&p capital iq is expecting earnings growth for the s&p 500 of 0.6%, no great shakes, that's for sure. >> i agree with that maria. and i think this has really become a position in the market, where we have had a great run. so you don't necessarily go out there with the broad-based index. you have to look at selective stories to invest your money in right now. the transports, first and foremost to us, were looking a little bit overvalued anyway. but if you break the transports down and you look at a company like csx or a norfolk southern, for example, those companies have continued to hit highs this week, and that's based off of valuation. fedex was a company, in my opinion, that was priced for perfection, they came out and reported lousy earnings and that doesn't surprise me. i think u.p.s. is a much better company. they didn't get hurt nearly as bad.
's a real big play. i'd love to know how citi holdings is doing in this rising environment. >> there's a lot to like. i like citi here and there you have the opening bell here. visa celebrating five years of trading on the nyse and at the nasdaq, the academy of nutrition and dietetics celebrating national nutrition month. >> by the way, speaking of banks and refinancing, the american consumer continues to refinance their household debt either through a refi of their actual home or taking out another credit card with a zero balance or low-balance offer and transferring the balance. visa was a $69 stock two years ago and it's opening today at about $159, right? >> look at that gain. in a market where people are still weak and we still have a tough consumer. >> remember, big international play. >> yes. much more so than ma. >> and it's just a very well-run company. >> a lot of american guys who have been good and have also been run by a foreign individual, and i don't mean to be phonetic, but this is a big worldwide company. >> i changed banks recently because my bank ceased banking so i got a
environment. >> you have to think about this. it's a process. it's physical therapy that now the patient is ready to talk again. >> it's sedation. the patient needs to be told they're going to get better. >> if i buy your argument, david, there's an inflection point that low interest rates are stimulus to a point and then it goes the other way. don't i only have to look to ecb for prove that's not right which kept its rate at 1%? >> there's so much else going on suppressing the economy. >> it's europe. >> i don't think we can -- >> they have a few labor issues, don't they, steve? a few structural problems. >> the analog is ecb did not go all of the way down. it maintained. >> it's europe. >> i don't think that borrowers or lenders really care whether the rate is 1% or half a percent. i don't think it makes any difference at all. the issue for people planning to buy a house or planning to expand a business is how the economy will do. part of the federal reserve's message that we'll see today that's crucial to the statement today, are they going to downplay the economy and talk about outsi
opportunities to do some stock picking in this environment and that's really what people need to be doing prp. >> so you're going to want to buy what jim lacamp's selling, is that the idea? >> as long as there are proven fundamentals and an attractive valuation argument. >> all right. rick santelli -- >> now, wait a minute. the fundamentals aren't improving that much. we're seeing earnings start to deteriorate. and fedex and caterpillar, their earnings started to deteriorate. we're seeing some of those if you want fundamentals sl s slac. >> you can't just go blindly by, you know, equities across the board. but there are opportunities to find pockets of the economy that are growing, despite all the negative and worries out there, as far as the macro environment. >> okay. but what about the fact that, you know, we were talking about this yesterday, bill, the s&p is expecting earnings growth, the s&p 500, of 0.7% for the first quarter. so we are looking at an earnings deterioration here. now, they're expecting things to pick up later on in the year. but if you're saying there is growth in the ec
of people worried about the impact fracking has on the environment. this is a possible solution, i guess, yes? >> it is, exactly. i help lead an investment group and funded some brilliant scientists down in florida actually a few years ago. our technology uses no chemicals. we actually in the past since 2008, we've cleaned over 2.8 billion gallons of water, which has eliminated 1.3 million gallons of chemicals. we allow these companies to, first of all, clean the water before they use it the first time, and then also recycle it and reuse it in their process. so we're closing the loop for these responsible companies. >> what about, drew, the government standards? i mean, hasn't this been one of the big detriments for moving forward? how have the standards changed? >> you know, it has been. and they're pushing for more transparency, regarding what chemicals are used, but where we come in, we eliminate those chemicals almost entirely. we allow these companies, we have technology that allows these technologies in realtime to clean their water, recycle it, and reuse the water. so we're elimin
environment. of course he's got a good record on inflation. he got lucky as it per takes to inflation because we had deleveraging. >> andy bush, the best part of jim is he's going to give you all these reasons, what does he call them, doppelganger reasons. when you have lecamp on the show it's not what he says it's what he's doing. he's like a federal government official. not watch what he says but what he's doing. that's why i love the guy. look at him he can't stop smiling. neither can you. you're both great. thank you so much. now folks, a busy day and night on capitol hill. the senate is busy voting on amendment after amendment in their budget bill. we got two distinguished senators about to join us give us their take and later on the show why can't police departments get any ammunition while the department of homeland security has bought up 1.6 billion rounds in the past year. there's no ammo for handdowns, shot guns, rifles, for training. what's up with this or is the dhs in a form of gun control that the congress can't legislate? folks don't forget free market capitalism is the best pa
choices. we're doing burgers in a different way in a new fast casual cooked environment. >> how much of a challenge is it when you come over here when horse meat is big in the news. >> food supply is really important. it's something we all have to face. we're using certified angus meat in the united states and we'll be using that here in europe and it's something we'll do a good job of keeping our eyes on. >> what do you think is smashburger's edge? we've been winning great food awards around the world. we tapped into this fast casual business model where you walk up and order and we bring the food to your table for you with a real nice fork and plate and offer $8 to $10 equivalent in the u.s. >> it's a higher price point, a different customer and hopefully better margins. what are your profit margins like and where do you want to see them go? >> we focus on getting the business of burgers right. our margins are approaching 20% which is really leading in the restaurant industry. we're doing well north of a million dollars out of our restaurants and we're doing it for less than half a
energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> >>> welcome back to "the kudlow report." i'm larry kudlow. stocks may have dropped today but we've still got even more good news on the economy. now does that mean bern bernanke is going take his foot off the gas pedal sooner rather than later? that might be what's rather bothering stock investors. and where is the new jack kemp now that we need him? a republican who related to everyone with an optimistic but simple message of economic growth for all, we will ask lar larry sabateau in just a few minutes. >> a tax is a tax is a tax. if you tax something more, you get less of it. piling on new taxes is always bad for economic growth period. and yet out of washington comes yet another proposal for another tax. this one known as the marketplace fairness act but it is just a national internet sales tax. could even hit yo
of trading. keep that in mind. it's a fabulous environment. last week's other four ipos were up 14% to 20% on the first day. all the tech names work so well. that's why i wanted to introduce you to a new company. it's called pinnacle foods. it's a house of food brands. some say b&g expecting to become public on thursday. pinnacle is a company you never heard of, i bet. but your products can be found in 85% of american house holds. you would recognize their brands. they've got a big frozen food business with bird's eye frozen vegetables, mrs. paul's seafood, lender's bagels, celeste pizza, as well as hungry man frozen meals which i thought looked like a delicious heart attack in a box. and pinnacle has a grocery business. you know them as duncan hines, cookie and cake miss, mrs. butterworth, log cabin, comstock pie filling. as we know from hines from its all-time high last month, iconic brands are the landmark. blackstone is ringing the register on its investment taking the company public. recent history suggests these deals are performing extremely well. case in point, since the beginning
? >> i do. what the united states is offer something a more stable environment. yes, of course, it's sluggish growth. and it also offers something call dividend. if you have bank deposits that will now be uninsured, where can you put your money? in the united states we have limits as well in terms of how much federal insurance we cover deposits. but if you put your assets in a company stock that has a solid balance sheet. yes, you will get flexuation but the dividend is a nice alternative rather than waking up and the government telling you that you lose 30% of your money. >> that woultd be a bad wake up call. so, now, check out the yahoo! finance question of the day. how are you positioning the international holdings in your portfolio? we'll bring you the results later in the show. let's go to josh with the market flash. >> check out thetanking now. the analysts saying that they are gaining on check point. conversations indicate a marketed increase in share losses in the past several months. sue, back to you. >> thank you very much. it's risk off today. we're off 116 points right
continues to be the case. i think that we're in a very low interest rate environment that continues to create this wealth effect and the money continues to go to the stock. >> got to leave it there, ben. thank you so much for your time today. >> thank you. >> want to show people quickly what's happening in gold and copper. copper is selling off. we talked briefly about china on the program, but the message should be it's not about a country of 1 million of 0.2% of zero gdp. it's about china and whether global growth jitters are coming back to the fore. with that in mind, we'll hand you over to "squawk box." thank you so much for tuning in. have a great day and hope to see you back here tomorrow.
focus makes it a good bet where the environment is growing. if you had to own an airline it should be alaska air because there's no more competition and it looks more and more like alaska air it has a beautiful balance sheet and beautiful growth prospects and they have decent fuel hedges and plus, they're still working through the benefits of the airtran composition and just last week we heard from the ceo of spirit airlines right here, that's the best-run low-cost player in the sector with terrific growth. remember, the ceo of save -- yeah, the cool symbol -- despite his low-cost structure, he's not competing with the majors. he's adopted what i call a wee willie keeler hit them where they ain't strategy. just google it. here's the bottom line, in the real world, we might not be able to invest in genuine unfettered, gorgeous monopolies like the rails, but oligopoly is the next best thing, and the airline business is the newest oligopoly out there. i like the three big boys the best, delta, united continental and especially u.s. airways, although up here we can wait for the pullbac
, job growth will continue to be over 2,000. and i think in that kind of environment, the fed will start to taper the pace of qe. sometimes in q3 and, yes, by the end of this year, i expect the qe to stop. but rates will be very low and the fed's balance sheet will be bloated for quite a long time. >> given the issues in europe, why take the risk? why even hint to markets that they may be exiting? or paps why not leave the accommodative can policies in place to help support the global economy? >> as we move into the summer, i think at that point the cost of this continued open ended deposit continues. i think they've come to the conclusion they don't need it as much. i think at that point, europe will probably be a little more stable. >> joe, in a word, jobless claims today, then, critically important. >> very important. i think they'll stay well below 350. >> it's an important level to watch. appreciate your time. from thank you, kelly. >> thank you for joining us on the show today. i'm kelly evans. this has been "worldwide exchange." time now for "squawk box" in the u.s. remember, peop
of my idols in business. they can't do as well in this environment. why is qlik view doing well if oracle can't? >> i think we are in one spot, they're total market. i think we drive the next generation of software. ease of use, time to value, agility and flexibility are the key drivers. more and more corporations are seeing that. if i don't empower my employees to make smarter decisions, i'm missing out on a big opportunity. we've been in that business for 20 years. we only focused on the user and the user's behavior when it comes to interacting with data. >> mark benioff has been on our show from sales force. he's trying to develop a dashboard people can use, sales people can use on the road, for instance. why is yours better than his or do they work together? >> they work together. i think mark built a great company. he's disrupted an industry just like we are doing in this industry we are in. one of our most common data sources for our clients is his system. so we sit on top of sales force and maybe two or three other sources and provide you with a dashboard of insight from
, then you hit the financial offshore of the environment. the choice should be obvious to the majority, at least to the european monetary union. >> and most people would assume before depositors were ever looked at as a source of cash, it would be the bondholders that got hit. if cyprus has to raise 67 billion and there's only 1.7 billion in bonds to go after, that won't solve the problem. should they still, though, have tried it? >> i think the natural way to proceed is first feed equity, then junior debt and then senior debt and, last, depositors. and that would very last insure the depositors. so yes, indeed. as you rightly pointed out, it's around 11.7 of which the majority is bailin. but the senior debt is just around 300 million, not billion, for the three largest banks. so it's very, very little. >> and angel gorria in that interview was saying next time or in general, someone has to pay and it should be the critters. nevertheless, antonio has to leave us. thank you for your time. we want to get back out to julia. now that russia has basically said, you know, sorry, no, the pres
of ceos talking about the lack of clarity in the global environment. i know a lot of the digital marketing dollars right now are based in the u.s. but these numbers seem pretty bullish to me. do you feel better or more cautious than last quarter when you look out at the rest of the year from here? >> jon, i think the macro trend is more spend is going to go digital. and when people talk about big data, we're the big data company for marketers. so as you talk about the hundreds of billions of dollars, where people are going to want to know what the return of investment is, there is no other company that's as well positioned as adobe, to really let them know how to spend that money and to accurately reflect what the return of investment is. so we think that the macro trends will fuel this business for many years. >> so what would be an appropriate growth -- yes, what would be an appropriate growth rate, then, for adobe? obviously, your stock is trading higher in the extended hours. a lot of people very pleased with the earnings results that we saw. is this sustainable, this year and next? wh
for under 15 minutes. it's a different environment. now they just play off the s&p, it gets to a level, people get back in, gets to a resistance, and they get back out. it's in and out, real quick. >> the number you would get, it changes on a daily basis. >> constantly, constantly. >> down 87 points here. we keep waiting for this correction. do you think we're going to be there at some -- it seems that each time we get this sell-off, somebody comes in to buy it up. >> again, the programs come in and buy it right up. you would like to see a correction, you would like to see this market correct, wash out a lot of things, but i don't think it's going to happen right now. i really don't. i think this market, as long as the feds keep injecting $85 billion a month, it's going to keep drifting up. it's going to leak up, like i say. >> well, it's leaking down right now, alan valdez. thanks for being with us here. we're heading towards the low. at the low of the day, we were down 128 points. right now, down about 88 on the dow jones industrial average. and again, we honor those members of the m
-qe and nonzero interest rate policy environment. the federal reserve has drilled rates down to zero because they cannot get gdp to grow because of tight regulation on the middle class. with zero percent rates, the saver earns next to noing, and the typical american family has no access to the american credit markets. >> i think we have a table we want to put up. you're basically saying that u.s. deposits are a little different from the cyprus story. u.s. savers have been badly damaged by the federal reserve policy. >> it's basically like a tax. if interest rates were at 2%, u.s. savers would earn 2% a year. last four years, they would have compounded out at 9%. instead, their earnings are basically zero, and they're underwriting the profits of the banks. >> jimmy, your response? >> you look globally at long-term interest rates, where are they going globally? down, down, down, even where banks aren't doing quantitative easing. those low rates reflect a weak economy. people aren't one thing. sure, they're savers, but they're also equity investors, who have done very nicely of late. if we foll
points. we don't anticipate a big change by the fed but given the environment around the globe this is important. >> i don't either. nobody around here seems to anticipate a big change in the fed policy. some are expecting they might tweak up their gdp forecast. that's a probability. probably we'll expect to see inflation expectations well anchored. i think you will hear that phrase as well. there's a problem with the stock market, although large parts of it are being ignored. fed ex and caterpillar had rather disappointing commentary and this is giving a lot of help to the bears who have been saying the gloge econobal econot as strong as the u.s. stock market is indicating here. the markets are ignoring fed ex and caterpillar and that's making traders say that's because all they care about is the federal reserve and what they have to say. wells fargo did downgrade another couple big machinery names, deer and agco. they downgraded that because they thought corn prices would be declining so sales would not be increasing as much next year. >> thank you very much, bob. to seema mo
, not really. if i got compliance. >> can you at least tell us in this environment, the fed looks like the one thing we've learn side more cover for the fed. i don't know how bad it gets in cypress or whether there is contagion, but the fed will go. >> i think from the u.s. economic perspective, in the last few years of summer slowdowns, it doesn't look like that will happen and we're waiting for pullbacks and maybe we're waiting for an opportunity, but it will be time to wait for equities if you get that. >> i think cramer's here and jim, remember early on we were talking about whether the market knows things and it's like we were looking at that big job's number and we didn't talk about it after it happened and we got six or seven straight new highs and a fiscal cliff. is this what we're seeing today, enough to put anything on hold in your view or do things still look pretty good for our markets here. we did have a series and when you look at the charts this weekend, i cannot believe how many straight ups and take a boeing and it is bad news that indonesia did not go with boeing and that sto
important is being present in the work environment. making better decisions for the organization. depending where you are in the company, they take a longer time to have an impact. we will see that over time. that's the importance of having mindfulness and a personal practice in the workplace at every level in the company. >> mark, you do yoga yourself as well? >> yes, i do. every morning. >> i was telling becky and andrew about your personal style. your ski accident, broken neck, falling down ravine and spending a year on painkillers until you discovered yoga, meditation, acupunctu acupuncture. tell us a little bit about that personal journey. >> well, i think until i had to find my way through a health care system that's really not a system and had to struggle with a debilitating neuropathy. i have it. terrible pain down my left arm all day long. the medical system gave me drugs. the disability system told me to go on long-term disability. they told me that the best hope for me was to live a reasonable good existence on disability payments and to deal with my pain, to focus on my pain. wh
's really challenging environment right now. what we're seeing is the retail economy is not doing that well. so fedex is having a tough go in the near term. it sounds like we'll get more aircraft retardants out of the fleet. that will be good for the cost structure. traffic up 20% this quarter. the ground business was up 10%. so doing very well if we can shrink the air fleet it becomes a much better story. >> you can shrink the air fleet, brandon, but it will have to contend with the fact that consumers, and fedex and ups talked about this in january. consumers are choosing cheaper ways to ship. they're willing to let things ship over a longer period of time. maybe longer in terms of the type of air they choose. and so i'm wondering if they're doing enough to combat the secular change in the business. >> well, that's a real criticism levied against the company. they have a really big ground work. and i think investors have excited about that. but we need a lot of aircraft for overnight dplifrry. be it domestically or from china. so i think investors are looking for them to get aggressive on
rate environment. >>> u.s. equities had been a little bit waerbg. they have been preparing their losses through the morning. dow futures only 11.5 points below fair value. we've been watching what happened overseas in asia. the nikkei was up 1 1/3. in europe, red arrows because of economic numbers. also concerns continuing about cyprus. the cac is done 1.1%. we have positive comments made by fed chairman ben bernanke. >> we'll use models and other indicators and the state of the labor market to try to make a good estimate how much we need to change the rate of flow. but, again, the point is to let the markets see our behavior, to let them see how we respond to changes in the market. and higher levels of purchases or the ultimate facing out of the program. >> in other words, it's not going to be spigot on, spigot off. rick is the head of strategy at wells fargo securities. rick, thank you for joining us this morning. >> thanks for having me. >> you have been right on some big calls in the past. you called it right almost to the day back in march of 2009. >> yeah. >> for the bottom. >> yo
this morning, this shows incremental softness in i.t. spending environment. that's weighing on all tech names. ibm is down 1.25%. that's a huge weight on s&p 500 at this hour. a lots of them we are watching in the tech sector. s.a.p. down 2.5%. crm down 1%. it is taking everything down at this point. >> oracle was bad. can't mince words about it. >> was oracle being bad a sign of what's bad in overall tech spending or was oracle bad more of a sign of what's bad at oracle? or both? >> it is a big government provider. dell is, too. that's hurt dell. this was sloppy execution. deliver, deliver, deliver. are they losing share in the cloud? clearly. they won too many nine-figure deals. at the same time the market says i want to buy that weakness. why is lululemon up? they want to buy that weak fles. looking for caterpillar to bottom today. onshore drillers, one of the weakest markets, he should buy those. things come down, people just want to buy them. >> do you agree with this 1% move on lululemon today? >> that it is up? no. i don't like lululemon. talk about bad execution. they've just been ter
a difficult environment, cameron international, an equipment player, has an enormous backlog. just last week, got a big order from petro. that's one where we expect substantial earnings growth each of the next several years. >> what else? keep it going while we have time. >> keep it going. in addition to that, we're hopeful for edwards life science. it's been a little more controversial. that's the catheter delivered heart valve. there's been debate about the pace of the launch of that. it's at a lower point now. we think expectations are probably more appropriate. and the stock is attractive. that one is also that we have good expectations for. additionally, in the technology space we have pretty good sized positions in google which is perked up on a year to date basis but we think is getting back on track. 12 months ago that was fairly controversial. it's not nearly so controversial now. >> all right. greg, you don't know offhand whether any of those companies are -- have open board seats, do you? >> no, i don't. i'm not aware of that. >> okay. just wondering. >> you have the science backg
in an environment that can be only described as alice in wonder land, how does the fed managing interest rates play into the interpretation of your survey. or does it at all in your opinion? >> well, i'm not sure if they do look at our survey or not. the reading i would take away is more and more are of the view they may start tweaking with the bond buying program. >> now from my perspective. let me make an assumption. let me say in my opinion i don't think they're going to pull back in a big way any time soon from some of these programs. so i guess the question i'm going to ask you this, is the bearish news showing up in con treat terms, not just opinion in your survey, should the interest rates remain tame and they actually have been dropping, what you are saying is that this could be a contrary indicator that's big out there. it can create a spiral where they need to run in and buy futures if rates start to drop. could that not be true as well? >> well, rick, i think you're right in thinking that is a possibility. we don't know for issue if this is a contrary reader or not. if you have reasons t
it into this social environment where you're users are engaging with the content. >> and then there's bill simmons, one of the star pundits of espn, doing live webcasts on youtube with friends. you get to hear his thoughts on the game in realtime. espn didn't sell ads, admitting this is a test run. they've committed zero dollars to ncaa rights and it's a low cost production. easy money. >> that is a business model right there. >>> a lot more still to come. tweet time. could texas be getting ready to hoard some gold? lawmaker wanting them to allow the state and texans to store gold at its own facility with protection of the state. if passed, texas would be the first state to have its own ft. knox, essentially, allow ting it to be protected by the tenth andment. if your home state could make its own protected depository for anything, what would it be and why? tweet us at squawk street and we'll get you responses in the next hour. >> in the meantime, interrupt. i believe we know why the markets have turned south. the head of the eurozone group, what we've seen in cyprus is now a template for future b
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)